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Research Interests

  • Developing a methodology for cross-craft comparisons in prehistoric societies – i.e., analyzing more than one type of craft production in tandem in order to look at important social, economic, and cultural relationships between different craftspeople and between craftspeople and other members of their communities.

  • Exploring non-traditional models of social complexity in Bronze Age societies of Oman and Southeastern Iran. Special attention is being paid to the site of Bat in Northwestern Oman and the site of Konar Sandal (“Jiroft”) in Southeastern Iran utilizing both fieldwork and study of the ceramics and small finds. Theoretical focus on the construction of public monuments and its relation to the rise of quasi-urban centers. 
  • Bat Report 2007                                                -  Bat Project featured in Science (2010)  PDF
  • Bat Report 2008        
  • Bat Report 2009
  • Bat Report 2010
  • Bat Report 2011        
  • Bat Report 2012
  • Bat Report 2013

  • Reinterpreting the archaeological sequence from the Neolithic to the Bronze Age in North-central Iran, Northeastern Iran, and Southern Turkmenistan based on ceramic parallels and stratigraphic reassessment of key sites. Special attention is being paid to the material assemblages of: Tepe Hissar in Northeastern Iran (with Prof. Robert H. Dyson, Jr., and Dr. Ayse Gursan-Salzmann, both of the University of Pennsylvania); Cheshmeh Ali in North-central Iran (with Dr. Timothy Matney (University of Akron), Dr. Hassan Fazeli (University of Tehran), and Prof. Holly Pittman (University of Pennsylvania)); Sang-i Chakhmaq in Northeastern Iran; Tureng Tepe in Northeastern Iran (with Kyle Olson); and Hotu/Belt (Kamarband) Caves in Northeastern Iran (with Dr. Michael Gregg (U.Penn.)).

  • Re-evaluating the connection between popular culture and gender/sexuality theories within the paradigm of Public Interest Anthropology (with Prof. Peggy Sanday (U.Penn.)). This study focuses on masculinity construction in American college campuses and how it manifests itself in overt and covert forms of violence.